CAW National Council 4000 - Mountain Region Website
 
Home   |   Who We Are   |   Contact Us   |   Search   |   Français
 
 
June 24, 2008
CAW marks the 100th Anniversary of the former CBRT & GW
At the recent CAW Collective Bargaining and Political Action Convention held in Toronto June 10-13, the
CAW took a moment to pay tribute and honour to what would have been the 100th anniversary of the
Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, Transport and General Workers Union (CBRT & GW), which merged
with the CAW in June 1994.  

Prior to merging with the CAW, National Council 4000 was part of the CBRT&GW, which was Canada's
first industrial union when it broke away from an American based International Union in 1908.  

Former CBRT & GW President Jim Hunter, in a heart-warming speech, gave delegates an overview of
the long and proud history, struggles and achievements of the CBRT & GW leading up to its merger
with the CAW.

Hunter stressed that he has no regrets about the decision to merge his Union's more than 33,000
members with the CAW, which was the best way of ensuring a strong, progressive Canadian home for
the CBRT & GW membership.

CAW President Buzz Hargrove presented Hunter with a plaque that recognizes the mark of the 100th
Anniversary of the CBRT & GW, which will be laid on a later date at the CAW Family Education Centre at
Port Elgin, Ontario.
Former CBRT & GW President Jim Hunter accepts a plaque
from CAW President Buzz Hargrove that will be laid at a later
date at the CAW Family Education Centre in Port Elgin, ON
 
Brother Hunter served for three terms as President of the International Transport Workers Federation, and is a regular guest of
the CAW at all its conventions.

The CBRT & GW, which was initially called the Canadian Brotherhood of Railway Employees (CBRE), was founded in
Moncton, New Brunswick by Aaron R. Mosher on October 12, 1908.  

The Union began to diversify its membership of blue and white collar railway workers to include highway transportation
workers, hotel and hospitality workers, health workers and seafarers to name a few.  Based on the diverse membership of the
CBRE, which was continuing to grow, the Union changed its name to one that was more fitting given its wide diversity to the
Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, Transport and General Workers Union.

In addition to starting the CBRT & GW, Mosher was also a founder of the All-Canadian Congress of Labour in 1927 as well as
the Canadian Congress of Labour in 1940.  He was a seasoned veteran of union battles over nationalism, communism, and
industrial unionism.  When the Canadian Labour Congress was formed in 1956, Mosher was named honorary president.

Of the many accolades Mosher's career in the labour movement brought him, the biggest came in 1981 when the Government of Canada issued a stamp in
honour of him.  Not only was the stamp issued in the centennial year of Mosher's birth, but also on the 25th anniversary of the Canadian Labour Congress and
was officially released on Labour Day!  Mosher is the only union leader ever to be depicted on a Canadian postage stamp.

The stamp included the figures of two railway workers flanking Mosher's portrait.  It is as near as we come to a stamp paying tribute to organized labour in
Canada.

CAW National Council 4000 and its five Regional Locals across Canada pay tribute to what would have been the
100th Anniversary of the Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, Transport and General Workers Union.
Close Window
www.cawcouncil4000.com  Mountain Region
Print [PDF]
Print [PDF]